Musings and photos of wild and everyday life

Posts tagged “Greylag Geese

Whoopers & Greylags at Christmas

Whooper Swans and Greglag Geese neighbours for Christmas

Whooper Swans and Greglag Geese neighbours for Christmas

They arrived in October this year as most years and apart from some very mild mornings, have enhanced our view from the house since.

A particularly nice sight on a frosty Christmas morning.

Happy Christmas and a brilliant New Year to all.

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Springing Up

Ducklings Grand Canal

Ducklings on Grand Canal

What a great change to the weather and suddenly, it seems, Spring is everywhere.

.The great hope of light and warmth and growth, after the dark and cold of winter, is inspiring.

Of course, as usual, everything is a bit later here in the foothills of the mountains!

Snowdrops

Snowdrops in garden

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Snowdrops have bloomed,

Snowdrop

Snowdrop in garden

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Crocus hybrids

Crocus hybrids in garden

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Crocuses are waning.

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Daffodil in garden

Daffodil in garden

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And now Daffodills brighten our roads and gardens and confirm the Spring promise.

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12 of 13 Mallard Ducklings on Grand canal

12 of 13 Mallard Ducklings on Grand canal

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It seems early  but we have already seen ducklings in the canal.  13 tiny balls of puffed up fluff darting around under the watchful eye of Mammy Mallard and 2 Drakes.

13!  That sounds like a lot of painful egg producing effort.

I don’t know if one of the Drakes was a friend, lover, brother or a security guard?  If a guard, he doesn’t seem to have been much good, as a couple of days later, no ducklings could be found!

We can hope they moved elsewhere but they seemed too tiny to go far and the birds on the Grand Canal do suffer great predation.

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Lamb in field Co Kildare

Lamb in field Co Kildare

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This is also lambing time around here and little white quadrapeds have been appearing in the nearby fields for about a month now.

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On the other hand we start to say goodbye to the Geese & Swans.

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Greylag Geese in rear field Blessington

Greylag Geese in rear field Blessington

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The Whoopers have already dissappeared but the Greylags are still feeding in the grass fields – probably stocking up for their long flights. .

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Anyway here’s looking forward to plenty more springing up in the coming weeks.


Moving On

Greylag Geese in Blessington FieldA very brief ‘less cold’ spell seems to have convinced the Whoopers to migrate back north.  The Greylags were not so easily fooled and still graze in Willie’s field.

Walking down the Liffey quays towards the lifting bridge, a group of Brent Geese had gathered a couple of weeks ago.  They are probably about to, or in the middle of migrating.

It is interesting to note their amazing travels while we lament their passing.

Whoopers typically fly to Iceland and northern Europe from Ireland while Greylags mainly return to Iceland.

Brent Geese, quite common flying over Dublin or grazing on grass fields, including football fields, in the Winter, head for Greenland or Canada.

Brent Geese on Liffey at Toll Swing bridge Dublin.

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It seems that when temperatures are beginning to get tolerable for us, the winter migrant birds get hot under the collar and feel the pull for colder climes.

Of course the weather this Winter and ‘Spring’ has been pretty miserable – one of the coldest March months on record.

But spring really is in full swing regardless of the cold and frost.  Witness the Crows at their rookeries, the Jackdaws sitting on wires or branches in pairs, not to mention the cute spindly-legged foals and the gorgeous young lambs.

Sheep & Lamb in Frosty field Rathmore Co Wicklow


Frosty Birds

Whooper Swans and Greylag Geese Frosty field BlessingtonMid-March and Spring is still springing but the weather has regressed – frost, snow and hail-stones seem to be more common than warming termperatures.

So the Whooper Swans and Greylag geese are still close-by.

The very idea of sitting with your belly on the frozen ground is enough to give the collycobbles!

When the birds move you can see a ‘melted’ space!  It can leave a patchwork pattern on the field.Whooper Swans in Frost field with Greylag Geese BlessingtonGreylag Geese in Frost field Blessington


Winter Woolies and Whoopers

Whooper Swan stretching in rear field Blessington

Viburnum flowers winterWell the cold continues but maybe not as bad as previous years – yet.  The temptation is to stay wrapped in woollies indoors.  But winter is an interesting time in the great outdoors.

Firstly the winter flowering shrubs such as Viburnum brighten gardens on even the dullest days.

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Whooper Swans in rear field Blessington 1879x

Secondly, as a side benefit of the cold, winter migrators such as Swans and Geese are attracted to Ireland.  We have the pleasure of living beside prime Whooper Swan & Greylag Geese real estate.

For many years, fairly large flocks could be seen and heard just over our garden wall.  In recent years they have been less in number and sometimes absent – particularly the geese.  Perhaps they found alternate accommodation or perhaps global warming had shifted them.

This year there are reasonably large flocks of Greylag Geese and about 20 Whooper Swans.

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Whooper Swan stretching in rear field BlessingtonWhooper Swans young & old in rear field Blessington.

Whoopers really are large birds .  Whooper Swan resting in rear field BlessingtonWatching them as they feed, rest, stretch and fly is a  real pleasure, especially from the comfort of the house.

As wild birds, they are easily disturbed and tend to stay well removed from our wall. To see them properly usually requires binoculars.  But sometimes they come closer, where perhaps the grass is thicker.

The birds move between the lakes and the fields and make quite a sight in the air – like large jets, it seems unreeasonable that they should be able to fly.  In fact they are amongst the largest flying creatures in the world.

And yet they are very good flyers and cover great distances, usually coming to Ireland from Iceland and Northern Europe.

Whooper Swan feeding in rear field Blessington.

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They are also a joy to hear.  Their honking sounds gave them their name, which was apparently originally Hooper.

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The Swans stay fairly close together but sometimes intermingle with the Geese.

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Greylag Goose walking in rear field Blessington.

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Greylag Geese are fairly common in Ireland in winter.  They are of course much smaller than the Whoopers and much darker.  It is only their number and sounds that make them conspicuous.

They too have probably travelled from Iceland where they breed.

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Greylag Goose in rear field Blessington.

While not ‘showy’ they are still striking when seen up close, with browny grey and white plumage, an orange beak and pinkish legs.

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So plenty of reasons to venture out and smell the flowers.

Viburnum flower buds winter