Musings and photos of wild and everyday life

Posts tagged “Travel

Seville

Giralda Cathedral Seville rcxs 4352This is a really majestic, beautiful and fun city. The large complex Cathedral and magnificent Giralda tower in Plaza Virgen de los Reyes, together with so many other lovely buildings, could take most of your attention.  Archbishops Palace Seville rcxs 4347
These buildings include the Bishop’s Palace in the North of the Plaza

Real Alcazar Gardens from viewing alll end rcs 4889

Reales Alcazares walled gardens

and the Royal Palaces, Reales Alcazares, to the South.

But Seville has much more and demands more time.  It is not a place to be rushed and only a hint of Seville’s treasures can be shown here.

Plaza de Espana towards N tower Seville rs 4681

Plaza de Espana looking towards North Tower

Plaza de Espana Seville at night rcs 4949Further South still and nearer to the river, you’ll be flabbergasted by Plaza de Espana, stunning at night as much as by day!

Gold Tower with Seville Tower behind rcs 4663And speaking of the river, a walk along the Guadalquivir is very relaxing with rowers and wildlife as well as other jewels including the Golden Tower and the Bull Ring, Plaza de Toros de la Maestranza.

Rowing under Triana or Isabel II bridge & Capilla Virgen del Carmen rcs 4661

Rowing under Triana or Isabel II bridge & Capilla Virgen del Carmen

It is hard not to see interesting buildings and the bridges are great in their own right.

Fountain & Ducks Maria Luisa Park Seville rcs 4463Beside Plaza de Espana, Maria Luisa Park is full of trees, ducks, water and offers some quiet and shade but it is very popular and busy.

Metropole & San Pedro church Seville rs 4610

Metropole & San Pedro church Seville

Finally check out a few of the many quirky churches – many along very narrow streets and the Metropole, a sort of modern art city canopy with awalkway and great views from the honeycomb-like roof.

3 tips –

  1. Spoonbill preening in Charco de la Boca lake El Rocio Spain rxs 8082

    Spoonbill preening in Charco de la Boca lake El Rocio

    It is a relatively short trip South to Donana National Park with Imperial Eagles, Peregrines, Azure-winged Magpies, Boar, Deer, Lizards and much more are to be seen or even shorter to Charco de la Boca lake at El Rocio where Glossy Ibis, Spoonbills, Egrets, Coot and many other birds thrive.

  2. Mercado de triana Seville rcs 4634

    Mercado de triana Seville

    This is a place that produces great food – enjoy.

  3. Seville Cathedral interior including ceiling organ & carvings rcss 4575Should the unthinkable happen and it rains, explore the interiors of Reales Alcatras and the Cathedral – even if not religious you will come away uplifted! 🙂
Advertisements

Sardinia NW

This is a place I always wanted to visit and it didn’t dissapoint.Alghero & coast Sardinia from South  It is an island in the middle of the Med which has managed to keep its charm despite growing tourism.

Lesser Kestrel M NW Coast Sardinia nr StintinoWherever you go there are birds and if you go in early summer, the weather is great – not too hot and the the island is still green.  We started our week in the NW, based in Alghero.  Nearby are a number of good places to watch birds, especially just to the North.

Apart from the sunshine, birds  and brilliant views, what struck us was the amount of wild flowers.

Wild Flowers & coast S of Alghero Sardinia

Birdwise, it was not hard to see many birds in the NW including  Lesser Kestrel, Squacco Heron, Little Egret, Black-winged Stilt and Marsh Harrier.

Squacco Heron flying over marsh NW SardiniaLittle Egret flying over marsh & Black-winged Stilt NW SardiniaMarsh Harrier F flying over marsh NW SardiniaRelatively common were Spotted Flycatchers  as well as Swifts while Bee-eaters could be seen in the country-side.Spotted Flycatcher Calabona Hotel Alghero SardiniaBee-eater on wire NW Sardinia

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Pallid Swift flying Alghero SardiniaBoth Alpine and Pallid Swifts can be seen chasing flies in the air.

.

.

.

.

.

The common Gulls here are Yellow-legged and I was pleased to see Little Terns.
Yellow-legged Gull scratching Stintino Sardinia
Little Tern at saline pool NW Sardinia

,

,

,

It’s a place you would like to visit with a long lens, tripod and more birding time. Sun setting from Calabona Hotel Alghero SardiniaLighthouse on Capo Caccia from boat

On the other hand, the beautiful scenery, caves, coast and unspoilt nature makes it a great place for a combined holiday / bird trip.Formations in Grotto di Nettuno NW Sardinia

Alghero Sardinia from S at twilight

Alghero Sardinia from South at twilight


SW France, Pyrenees – Review of 2010 – September

September

Sun rising over Collioure, France
Sunrise over Collioure France

Sun, Sea, good food and new birds – it must be holidays away time.  Last year we went to the SW corner of France to a town called Collioure, for 1 week and to the pyrenees for the next.

Collioure is lovely with castles, great food and fine beaches.  There is also plenty of wildlife both around the town and nearby.

Around the town I saw Crested Tits, Sardinian Warblers and Golden Orioles amongst other more normal species.  Outside the bird world there were Purple Hairstreak and Swallowtail butterflies, Hummingbird Hawk moths, Hornets and Robber Flies, Wall and Iberian Rock Lizards and Marbled Swimming Crabs.

Kentish Plover Winter plumage at Etang de Canet near Perpignan

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Nearby there were some good birding spots including the Etang de Canet.  Birds spotted included Chilean Flamingos,Little Egrets, Kentish Plover (left) and a Montagu’s Harrier.

There were quite a few Crag Martins around some of the old towns.

Some had nests on the roof beams of a Church entrance.

Crag Martin on nest in roof of church entrance
Crag Martin on nest in roof of church entrance

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Ordesa Mountains & rio Ara fromTorla Aragon Spain
We went to the Pyrenees via the Dali Museum in Fugueres and the City of Girona, both places of interest in their own rights.  But nothing prepared us for the magnificance of the Pyrenees and particularly, the Ordesa Valley.

The air is fresh, the water sparkling clear and the views incredible.  If you never saw any wildlife you would probably still be happy.

This is pretty close to the view from where we stayed – an incredible sight to open the window to, the first evening we arrived!

There are brilliant views everywhere and there are brilliant birds and other animals but you have to be prepared for some good hikes and severe slopes to make the most of such a brilliant place.

.

Egyptian Vulture flying ove Rio Ara Valley Torla Spain.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

If you’re in the Pyrenees, you might expect to see Vultures.  There are plenty here.

We saw this Egyptian Vulture beside Torla, where we were staying, circling around and gaining height in the thermals.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Dipper in river Ara, Bujaruelo Valley, Spain
Ordesa y Monte Perdido is a national park and the oldest Nature Reserve in Spain. It encompasses the valley and surrounding mountains, including Monte Perdido (Mont Perdu in France or Lost Mountain) reaching 3,355 metres.

In the Summer season it can get quite busy and cars are banned from the park. Access is by foot or bus from Torla. But you don’t have to walk far from the bus stop in the ‘Prairie’ – a flat grassy area on the valley floor – to get away from the crowds.

..
.

Up in the higher valleys, dare-devil Dippers seem to be on every section of every river.

.

.

Large male Mountain Grasshopper (Stauroderus scalaris) Ordesa Valley
.

.

With so much clean air and fresh water, insects abound, especially on the warmer days.

In some parts you could not look at the grass without seeing Grasshoppers although it is their sounds that first brings attention.

Female Black Redstart with insect Ordesa Valley Spain.

.

.

.

There are some great walks most of them involving steep climbs when you can be sorry for the extra camera lens you brought!

We were rewarded with Vultures, a Wall Creeper, Jays, Ravens, Reed and Willow Warblers.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

At the end of the valley is the Circo de Soaso, a classic glacial ‘cirque’ at the head of a glacial valley.

Here the valley is broader and once again meadow like.  Birds seen here included Water Pipit and Black Redstart.

Waterfalls on river Arazas, Ordesa Valley, Spain
Waterfalls on river Arazas, Ordesa Valley, Spain

.

.

.

.

.

The higher walks are a must if your legs allow.  The views are stunning and you can get closer to the vultures and other birds and animals.

However the valley can be walked along the river, although even this is a bit hilly.  Along the way are many waterfalls, each one seemingly better than the last.

Pyrenean Chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) pyrenaica peeing, Ordesa Valley, Spain.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Marsh Tits and Pied Flycatchers can be seen along the river banks and there are also mammals about.

We saw many Marmots as well as Pyrenean Chamois, like this one peeing on the valley slopes.

.

.

Griffon Vulture flying, Anisclo Canyon, Pyrenees, Spain .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Bujaruelo valley and Anisclo Canyon, both nearby are well worth a look.  Anisclo is great for Griffin Vultures that fly over the narrow canyon and sit on the high ledges.

Lammergeier or Bearded Vulture flying, Ordesa Valley, SpainWe also saw Red Squirrels, Adonis Blue Butterflies and a Jersey Tiger Moth.

.

.

But the vulture that I wanted to see but didn’t really expect to see is the Lammergeier.

We caught a glimpse of one in the distance early in the week in Ordessa but its wings were so long that at a distance it looked like a falcon.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Near the end of the week, on a trip along the southern rim of the valley, we finally saw this magnicifient creature properly and could see why it is also known as the Bearded Vulture.

Here high in the mountains, the Lammergeier seems to be at home, gliding without any obvious effort.

It still didn’t look that big but its wings are well over 2 metres across.  They seem narrower and pointier than other vultures which makes them look different.

.

A trip along the valley rim by 4×4 is well worthwhile, not just for the birds but also for the views down and along the length of the valley.

It would be great to have a large lens up there but that would mean serious weight and a tripod – hardly conducive to long walks or holidays in general.

Places like this need to be enjoyed slowly, with or without a camera!


Tanzania & Ethiopia Birds – Review of 2010 – March

March

Work brought me to Dar es Salaam where I stayed on the coast.  There was a great array of birds on view at the lagoon.  This included Indian House Crows, Kingfishers, Sacred Ibis, Whimprel and these Crab Plovers Crab Plovers Dar coastwhich have thick heavy-looking beaks.

I’ve always liked Dar but it is not everyone’s cuppa.  Very hot and sticky in the day time with dreadful traffic and road problems for its 3 million people, it is still a great mix of styles, chaos and life.   The evenings are lovely with nice temperatures and peacedul sunsets.

Sunset Dar coast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From there I flew to Addis Ababa for the first time.  It is much more spread out  and spacious than I had expected.  I also expected it to be very poor which it is in parts but it is also growing fast and the economy is good – at least in the main centres.  Addis has nearly 4 million people and like all of Africa, Chinese money and projects are clearly visible.

Speckled Mousebird

 

Again I didn’t have too much time to go far but even the birds in the city look quite exotic like this Speckled Mousebird with an impressive tail.

Pied Kingfisher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before flying home on the Saturday, I managed a quick visit to the crater lakes at Debra Zeyt to the south.  Here there were great numbers of birds and many I didn’t recognise.  On one of the lakes there was a huge flock of Little Grebes while Herons, Ibises and Cormorants hugged the margins.    Small birds gave voice to the trees and bushes all around the edge.

Malachite and Pied Kingfishers were reasonably common.  I was only sorry not to have a better and longer lens having to do with a 70-300 to fit in with a business-like briefcase!

Returning to the city I found many vultures flying around or sitting on the roof tops.  These included White-backed and Ruppell’s Griffons (below L&R),  Hooded and Egyptian.  There were also a few Maribiu Storks brightening the sky.

Ruppell's Griffon Vulture

White-backed Vulture

Flying home there was a good view of Dublin port.  Somehow it looks more impressive from the calm sky with the hum of the jets, compared with walking on the ground where you are more aware of  litter.  On the other hand, Bull Island which was also clearly visible looks interesting but nothing like as amazing as it is from the ground.  This is one of Dublin’s jewels and still survives despite the determination of planners to destroy it through the second causeway without a bridge or channel for the water.  Silt is still filling in the lagoon.

Dublin Port and Bull Island from sky

Home in Wicklow, I was reminded that it was spring by lambs at The Lamb.

Lamb at The Lamb, Blessington Road


Granada, Alhambra Caterpillar Nests – Review of 2010 – Jan

As I still haven’t got used to 2011 and am new to blogs, I start with a review of 2010.

January

Pretty cold in Ireland so spent New Year in Granada, Spain.  Lovely city with great buildings, athmosphere and views.  Wildlife-wise it wasn’t the greatest trip but you couldn’t miss the sound of the numerous Sparrows preparing to roost in the trees in the city’s squares.

Pine Processionary Caterpillar Larval Nest

Outside the city we found a few Larval Nests of Pine Processionary Caterpillars.

Like millions of others we had to visit the Alhambra.  It has great views of the city and surrounding countryside but  is not easily forgettable in its own right.

Eventually cold Dublin had to be faced but it can look pretty good in the snow …